A PISCATORIAL CONSCIOUS UNCOUPLING – Stillwater CARP. Blog entry 559

Click to play video

If you’ve watched the video this week, and you do so regularly, then you will probably have recognised the venue as one that has featured a few times recently in my blog entries. It’s the Seggy Pool, which is on the Kinver Freeliners’ ticket. With a short break imminent due to it being one of the few stillwaters I know to have a close season, I wanted to get one last session in before it shut. I was really confident, but in itself, that won’t put fish on the bank.

One on the bank from the Seggy
One on the bank from the Seggy

As it happened I landed two and had a hook-pull on a third. Or maybe a piscatorial ‘conscious uncoupling’, a development of the term a famous couple used this week to describe their separating. At least I caught though and it will probably be the winter now before I’m back on there. I also share a few thoughts on angling sponsorship in the video, which for many creates all manner of negative responses. I don’t see why though. As long as anglers are up-front about their attachments and honest about their catches, there shouldn’t be an issue.

I've been using groundbait for carp for some years
I’ve been using groundbait for carp for some years

In fact, many years ago, before I even thought I’d ever have any angling involvements myself, I always thought that the ones who don’t like sponsorships are generally the ones who don’t have them. I do have a few involvements myself, am open about them, and actually have a link on my home page so that they’re out in the public.

Another Seggy carp
Another Seggy carp

I used the same rig throughout the sessions in this blog entry. The hooklink and hooks were the SBS ones I have already mentioned, although I switched baits depending on the venue. My second outing was to my carp night syndicate. I didn’t know how it was fishing, but with a couple of fish already on the bank, I had the luxury of being able to afford a blank or two, should that be the case. Blanks seem to terrify some anglers, but the sort of fishing I do, they’re part of the journey. On one venue I’m a syndicate member of, the carp anglers can go a whole season without getting a run.

Keeping the rig nice and simple
Keeping the rig nice and simple

As it happened, I blanked on the overnighter and likewise on the three-night session I did following. This was on a gravel pit, and drops in the category I mentioned where you might get one run a year. That is not to everyone’s taste of course, and that’s the great thing about fishing, it can be to each and every one of us what we want it to be. The plus side, on a personal level, is although I haven’t caught many carp from there, they have all been big ones.

Last visit to Seggy Pool for a while
Last visit to Seggy Pool for a while

On the nature front I have seen everything really come on in the last few weeks. Although I did see over-wintering chiffchaff (3 individual birds) at the start of the year, the first singing migrants have started to arrive. In addition I saw my first sand martins, dashing around catching insects. But as a reminder that winter doesn’t let go very easily, on the day I saw them, accompanied by singing warblers in the background, a flock of c.75 fieldfare came in to roost on an island on the pit.

One of our early flowering plants - Lesser celandine
One of our early flowering plants – Lesser celandine

If you’re into your nature, as well as your angling, then make sure you ‘like’ my Facebook page. I post a daily ‘Nature news’, which is a report of everything I’ve encountered during that day. I love British nature, and for me, angling is the perfect platform from which to view it. As well as birds, I’m into wildflowers, butterflies, trees. In fact the whole lot. I’ve seen the African Big Five in their native environment, yet I’m still thrilled when I spot a rare flower, unusual bird or secretive mammal here in the UK. (Published March 29 2014)