UP FOR THE CHALLENGE – Fishing for CARP in coloured water. Blog entry 554

 Click play to watch this week’s video

As I say at the start of the video, I’m often asked by anglers outside the area where to stay when visiting for a session. I was thinking particularly of the River Severn though, and was hoping to do a barbel outing on there to incorporate the B&B information. However, with the river well into the surrounding fields, and the season running out fast, I decided to hit one of my favourite winter carp lakes instead. Near Bridgnorth, the Seggy Pool on the Kinver Freeliners’ ticket is still in the county of Shropshire. Plus it’s not that far from Shewsbury anyway, so it’s possible that someone would fish that sort of radius and stay over at Ferndell. So the fishing ties in with the accommodation.

Lots of colour in the lake
Lots of colour in the lake

On arrival at the lake, the first thing I noticed was that the rain had taken its toll on the colour. Having never fished it in such a state, it was new territory. I’ve never blanked on there, even in the harshest of winters I have managed a few fish. However, as the hours rolled on I was beginning to wonder if maybe I was about to register a first. It was quite obvious that the sediment washed into the lake had seriously affected the appetite of the carp at least. But he who perseveres to the end, and all that. Although just the one fish, and not a big one at all, at least I had managed to end up on the right side of the line. The line between success and failure in angling is a very thin one at times.

The thin line between success and failure
The thin line between success and failure

As I played the fish, I really didn’t want a hook-pull. Not that I get too many, certainly not enough to be concerned about, but I just knew on this occasion I wasn’t going to get too many bites of the cherry. So although just a small fish, I was very happy to slip it in the net and on the bank. Mind you, as you can see from the photograph above, it was certainly a good-looking one. The fish from Seggy Pool, if not the biggest, are some of the most stunning I’ve ever come across. And of course, as always, you can only catch what’s in the venue. As far as Seggy is concerned, if I catch a double I’m happy. The closer it gets to ’20’ the better, but the overwhelming majority of fish are nowhere near that.

On the bank in session two
On the bank in session two

Undeterred though by the conditions, in fact challenged by them, I was back on the lake the very next day. It gave me the opportunity to put a few boilies out over each spot – lobworm on one and M1 on the other before I left. Back not much after first light, I was raring to go. I had given the session some thought and was determined to crack it again, which realistically meant avoiding a blank. The pre-baiting I felt was the key, the fish weren’t going to be as mobile as they normally were, so once they came across some food they would stay. Would my plan work?

Nice to fish in sunshine for a change
Nice to fish in sunshine for a change

Well, within minutes of casting out I had a screamer on the 14mm M1 pop-up. Before I even had time to set the camcorder up I had a fish on the bank. A result, but would there be more out there waiting for me to catch? As it was, I had a steady trickle of fish and ended the session with five commons and one mirror. The conditions were identical to the day before, yet I had gone from struggling to a reasonable day. Apart from dropping on the fish in the first place, which is easier said than done, sometimes I’m convinced that the overnight bait had brought them in and kept them. In fact I’ve never had a fish that quickly before on the lake.

And finally... a mirror
And finally… a mirror

There are a few venues I fish that are permanently coloured regardless of the conditions, so the fish there don’t know any difference. But in this case it was something they aren’t exposed to very often, certainly to this extent. All that sediment in the water must be like a person who isn’t used to it, suddenly finding themselves in the dense smog of a city somewhere. I would think that the two common denominators would be mobility and appetite, so on that front I was really pleased to catch what I did. Finally, if you like this blog why not share it via the social media buttons? Many thanks if you do and don’t forget, the video can be shared separately if required. (Published February 22 2014)