It’s spring and time for some carp (carp, entry 511)

With the winter finally behind us it was nice to start thinking about different fisheries, approaches and species. And with Kinver Freeliners taking on a new venue, I decided to give that a go for carp. I have fished it once before, for perch, but this time I dusted down the oversized goldfish gear.


And in with that went my new shelter. Well I say new, I’ve had it since the end of last year. But with the conditions as they were it has lain dormant. Not that I haven’t been fishing of course, just that the weather called the shots in terms of species and style. So with milder conditions finally breaking through it came out of hibernation.

Debut outing for my new shelter
Debut outing for my new shelter


The best overnight shelter I’ve ever owned has been the Fox Evolution, and with this Wychwood one having a similar flexibility, I thought I’d give it a go when I found myself in the market for a new one. With heavy rain at times it held up well on its debut outing. I fished on one of the points on the pool with the left rod off an overhanging tree and the right one in open water towards an island.


My bait approach was 2x10mm M2 on the left rod and a 14mm lobworm pop-up on the other. Both baits were dipped and fished over pellets and boilies. The pellets were M2 and Multimix so everything was pretty much coordinated. I was fishing by late afternoon and it wasn’t long before I had my first fish, a small tench on the pop-up.

A common caught at dusk
A common caught at dusk


I do love night fishing, and as the sun set, apart from the sounds of the natural world it was totally quiet. I couldn’t even hear any cars. And with one farm house half a mile away and a village three miles across the valley I was truly in my element. The place to myself and in a remote spot – brilliant!


I did have a fight break out behind me though in the early hours as two badgers were slugging it out with each other. They were so preoccupied that they never noticed me and the fact they were illuminated by my headtorch. The moment they realised they were being watched though, they separated and were off at high speed.

Home for the night
Home for the night


The carp were so prolific that by 2.00am I brought the rods in so I could get some sleep. But they weren’t big fish though, just small ones as the photographs show. There are bigger ones in there but I think it’s a case of working through the smaller ones and using larger baits. But if you just want a bend in your rod then I think it’s a great venue for Kinver members.


You can check out the Kinver website via the link at the foot of my own site. There are some great waters with some on day ticket as well. All the details are on the internet. It’s definitely worth considering membership although there is a long waiting list. There’s nothing lost by getting your name down though.

A dawn carp on the bank
A dawn carp on the bank


With a couple of day sessions to round the week off I decided to fish another pool. It won’t throw up the amount of the Kinver venue but it certainly has better prospects for bigger fish. Quality over quantity. Suits me. I opted to continue with the 2xM2 boilies but went for 3x corn shaped poppers on the other.


The venue attracts a lot of pleasure/match anglers and the fish will be used to sweetcorn. And that’s exactly what I fished the poppers over. With an overhanging tree either side, that’s where I put the baits. Although it was a beautiful day I only saw two sub-surface carp. Hopefully that meant they were all on the deck.

Cast out and ready to go
Cast out and ready to go


I was there from 12.30pm until dark, which at this time of the year means you can get a decent bankside shift in. A couple of hours in and the swinger on the corn rod fell. Then rose slightly. Then fell again. I had hooked something but it wasn’t big. The result was the rudd in the photo below. I had avoided a blank but not really what I was after.

A small rudd so I'm not a blanker
A small rudd so I’m not a blanker


As the afternoon wore on my bite alarms remained silent. And then without any warning whatsoever, something had picked up the M2 boilies and didn’t like the fact it was now connected to a hook. This was no small rudd for sure. After a very determined struggle I finally won the battle and banked the mirror below.


And that was that, again confirming the thin line between ‘success’ and ‘failure’. The number of times I’ve had just one fish in a session must be well into the hundreds. But that one fish has often turned a blank into a decent outing. That’s why we should never give up. We’re always just one bite away from the fish of a lifetime.

Just the one carp on session two
Just the one carp on session two


I was back on the same pool a day later, but this time in a different swim. My bait approach was the same though. And the water temperature was identical at 11.4C. Funnily enough I heard someone shout across the lake to his friend, ‘The water’s cold today’. Well it wasn’t and that’s why we need a thermometer if we want to know what’s happening temperature-wise.


But regardless of the temperature, I blanked. So that in a nutshell is how the session went. Even when there’s no action though I still like to mention that fact. My Angling Journal is a weekly update and if it is to be a true picture then it has to include the ‘lows’ as well as the ‘highs’. And talking of my website, you can check it out via the link below. And I’ve just started a new angling Facebook page, so make sure you ‘like’ it. The link is on my site. (Published April 27 2013)

Visit my angling website HERE